Foam

Not a day goes by without one of our clients or colleagues commenting on photographs in our meeting rooms. They may reflect on the style of a photograph or ask why it is there. Discussion. That is what we wanted to achieve by displaying our collection of photographs in our Amsterdam office and on our homepage.

Photography museum Foam and De Brauw have started collaborating in 2010.

Geert Potjewijd, De Brauw’s managing partner says: “We would like to contribute to the cultural environment of Amsterdam and support young Dutch talented photographers. There is a natural match between Foam and De Brauw. Both organisations, with international ambitions, have quality as a basis.”

This month’s photo on our website
Untitled from Matter/Burn Out, 2016 @ Daisuke Yokota / courtesy of the artist and G/P Gallery

Daisuke Yokota (Saitama, b. 1983) is at the frontline of a new movement of Japanese experimental photographers. He is working out of, and pushing forward, a Japanese photography tradition that harks back to the intuitive experimentation of the Provoke generation. In the Matter exhibition at Foam, Yokota focuses on the aspect of volume and material of photography, pushing the medium and its perception forward into ever more original directions. Three installations revolve around the tactile aspects of photography, in which the outcome of the artwork is not determined by the camera, but by experiments with the material forms of the medium.

Yokota was chosen as the winner of the tenth Foam Paul Huf Award in 2016. He was first featured in the Talent Issue of Foam Magazine in 2013, and his works from his Site/Cloud series were the subject of a 2014 solo exhibition at Foam. Yokota lives and works in Japan, where he graduated from the Nippon Photography Institute in 2003. In 2015, Yokota won the Photo London John Kobal Residency Award. He is represented by G/P Gallery, Japan.

Matter can be seen at Foam from 17 March until 4 June 2017.

(The photo is a detail of an untitled photo from the series Matter/Burn Out)

“I see something special and show it to the camera. The moment is held until someone sees it. Then it is theirs.”

Sam Abell